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Germany - German Imposing Parede Helmet - " Pickelhaube" - Excellent Reproduction

Lot reference 12344803
Germany - German Imposing Parede Helmet - " Pickelhaube" - Excellent Reproduction

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$ 89 Bidder 3469
22-09-2017 20:41:05
$ 83 Bidder 1285
19-09-2017 11:46:07
$ 77 Bidder 2520
18-09-2017 22:01:38
$ 71 Bidder 9697
16-09-2017 18:31:46
$ 59 Bidder 7225
16-09-2017 18:31:26
$ 59 Bidder 9697
16-09-2017 18:31:26
$ 43 Bidder 7225
16-09-2017 14:07:37

Excellent reproduction, in lether with golden metal, new

Country: Germany
Type: Helmet
Period: 19th - early
Condition: Mint

The Pickelhaube (plural Pickelhauben; from the German Pickel, "point" or "pickaxe", and Haube, "bonnet", a general word for "headgear"), also Pickelhelm, was a spiked helmet worn in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by German military, firefighters, and police. Although typically associated with the Prussian army who adopted it in 1842-43, the helmet was widely imitated by other armies during this period.
The Pickelhaube was originally designed in 1842 by King Frederick William IV of Prussia,[3] perhaps as a copy of similar helmets that were adopted at the same time by the Russian military.[4] It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on the earlier Napoleonic cuirassier. The early Russian type (known as "The Helmet of Yaroslav Mudry") was also used by cavalry, which had used the spike as a holder for a horsehair plume in full dress, a practice also followed with some Prussian models.
Frederick William IV introduced the Pickelhaube for use by the majority of Prussian infantry on October 23, 1842 by a royal cabinet order. The use of the Pickelhaube spread rapidly to other German principalities. Oldenburg adopted it by 1849, Baden by 1870, and in 1887, the Kingdom of Bavaria was the last German state to adopt the Pickelhaube (since the Napoleonic Wars, they had had their own design of helmet, called the Raupenhelm (de), a Tarleton helmet). Amongst other European armies, that of Sweden adopted the Prussian version of the spiked helmet in 1845 and the Russian Army in 1846
From the second half of the 19th century onwards, the armies of a number of nations besides Russia (including Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Portugal, Norway, Sweden, and Venezuela) adopted the Pickelhaube or something very similar. The popularity of this headdress in Latin America arose from a period during the early 20th century when military missions from Imperial Germany were widely employed to train and organize national armies. Peru was the first to use the helmet for the Peruvian Army when some helmets were shipped to the country in the 1870s, but during the War of the Pacific the 6th Infantry Regiment "Chacabuco" of the Chilean Army became the first Chilean military unit to use them when its personnel used the helmets—which were seized from the Peruvians—in their red French-inspired uniforms. These sported the Imperial German eagles but in the 1900s the eagles were replaced by the national emblems of the countries that used them.
Tsarist Russian Pickelhauben, with detachable plumes, mid 19th century
The Russian version initially had a horsehair plume fitted to the end of the spike, but this was later discarded in some units. The Russian spike was topped with a grenade motif. At the beginning of the Crimean War, such helmets were common among infantry and grenadiers, but soon fell out of place in favour of the fatigue cap. After 1862 the spiked helmet ceased to be generally worn by the Russian Army, although it was retained until 1914 by the Cuirassier regiments of the Imperial Guard and the Gendarmerie. The Russians prolonged the history of the pointed military headgear with their own cloth Budenovka in the early 20th century.
All helmets produced for the infantry before and during 1914 were made of leather. As the war progressed, Germany's leather stockpiles dwindled. After extensive imports from South America, particularly Argentina, the German government began producing ersatz Pickelhauben made of other materials. In 1915, some Pickelhauben began to be made from thin sheet steel. However, the German high command needed to produce an even greater number of helmets, leading to the usage of pressurized felt and even paper to construct Pickelhauben.
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De 2772  top

Feedback score: 100%
Reviews given: 102
Member since: April 21, 2016
  • Very pleased with purchase and thank you for the little additional gift and quick delivery

    Uhlan February 19, 2018

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    Snel verstuurd, goed verpakt
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    missy7 February 13, 2018

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    corespond parfaitement , bien emballé , merci
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    savoie74 December 14, 2017

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    Keine Lieferung erfolgt.
    Bei Nachfragen nicht gemeldet.
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    dagober December 9, 2017

    Response by seller
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    Dear Michael,
    Your item was shipped the same day as your payment. Unfortunately the address you reported was wrong, and the package returned to Berlin. Please send me and Catawiki the correct address and I will be happy to resend your item.
    I was sad and I apologize for the inconvenience.
    (Contact Catawiki and enter the correct address.)
    Kind Regards
    Daniela

    Lieber Michael,
    Ihr Artikel wurde am selben Tag versendet wie Ihre Zahlung. Leider war die von dir gemeldete Adresse falsch und das Paket kehrte nach Berlin zurück. Bitte senden Sie mir und Catawiki die richtige Adresse und ich werde gerne Ihren Artikel erneut senden.
    Ich war traurig und entschuldige mich für die Unannehmlichkeiten.
    (Kontaktieren Sie Catawiki und geben Sie die korrekte Adresse ein.)
    Mit freundlichen Grüßen
    Daniela
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    Très. Très. Bien. Merci. Beaucoup.
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    ratounas54 November 27, 2017

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